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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
, nancy. jan crawford has been covering the romney campaign. she is in boston tonight. jan? >> well, scott, governor romney just landed here about an hour ago after making campaign stops in that key state of ohio and in pennsylvania. he talked to reporters on the way back on the plane and he said he felt good about this campaign. they hadn't left anything in the locker room and that he thinks they're going to win. he said he just finished his victory speech. he's not written a concession speech. now, the mood inside the campaign tonight, scott, is one of cautious optimism, i'd say. but there is a little bit of nervousness and here's why: campaign sources that i'm talking with tonight say they are encouraged by the high numbers of republican turnout they're seeing in these swing states like ohio, florida, virginia. they believe that will outperform john mccain in 2008. that's the key to this election. they really had to run up the score in those areas. but here's where the nervousness comes in. they're also seeing some of the president's turnout in some of those democratic areas like in nor
in boston. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks join us with their analysis. >> ifill: jeffrey brown on who's voting and why, plus key congressional races with christina bellantoni and stuart rothenberg. >> woodruff: we get historical perspective from michael beschloss and richard norton smith. >> ifill: and hari sreenvasan shows how you can find the latest results online at our data-driven map center. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> music is a universal language. when i was in an accident i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own. with united health care i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from, and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a heal
at the boston convention center. i talked to a top campaign aide, he said they were feeling confident. they like what they're seeing in their internal polls. now it's just all about which of these candidates' supporters are most intense and most enthusiastic and how many of them are going to turn out to vote today. >> jan crawford, thank you. president obama made his last campaign stops monday in wisconsin, ohio, and iowa. and after his final rally in des moines, the president spent the night in his hometown of chicago. nancy is there. good morning. >> reporter: the president is waking up in his own townhouse th morning, and unlike governor romney, he is staying put. no campaign stops. he'll play a traditional pickup basketball game with friends and aides, maybe drop by obama campaign headquarters to thank all of his staffers and volunteers. then tonight he will head to this convention center for what he hopes will be a victory party. on a clear, chilly night, president obama joined 20,000 supporters at the same corner in downtown des moines where he opened a small campaign office back in 2007.
-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slaves. several white residents marched complaints -- loged complaints. >> colonial life in british occupied boston, saturday night at 8:00 eastern, part of a holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span
eastern time to concede the race. jan crawford is in boston, where the republican nominee spoke to his supporters. jan, good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning, charlie. good morning, norah. romney actually waited about an hour to concede after ohio was projected to go for the president. that, of course, being the must-win state. everyone knew at that point the race was basically over, but the campaign wanted to see some of those actual votes come in, just to make sure. and then of course, advisers tell me once they saw colorado go for the president, they knew that was it, so governor romney picked up the phone and called the president. >> this election is over, but our principles endure. i believe that the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. >> reporter: a defeated mitt romney was gracious. >> i believe in america. i believe in the people of america. >> reporter: after running for president for 17 months, his campaign came up empty. >> like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the fi
the obama campaign and boston behind the scenes with romney. to the heated battleground states across the country where this election will be decided and our team tracking your vote everywhere in the crossroads of the world with the crowds in times square. and with our partners from univision in miami plus abc's barbara walters, katie couric and our powerhouse team telling you who's winning and why on this historic night, election night 2012, the stakes so high, the race so close, america's next president decided tonight. it's "your voice, your vote." once again from abc news election headquarters in times square, new york, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> you are looking at times square, usa, the pulse of the nation. also the crossroads of the world, 182 million people pass through here every year and tonight, it is election headquarters for abc news and we are so glad to have you back with us on this very big night, george. >> we have an entire team right out here with us. our reporters an analysts over on that side of the room, jon karl karl, cokie robert, ron brownstein.
romney began his concession speech in boston. miami mayor carlos gimenez apologized to voters, but he insisted officials had done all they could. >> we had a very long ballot. it was the longest ballot in florida history. were there problems in certain precincts? without a doubt. >> suarez: and the county elections department said it was simply a numbers game. >> this is volume driven. >> suarez: late today, election workers in miami-dade county and across florida were still counting thousands of absentee ballots. delays mean the presidential result has not been made final. the state has until saturday to certify results and confirm who will get the 29 electoral votes. for more on the ongoing ballot counting in florida and the sluggish voting elsewhere, we turn to marc cuto,he "mimi herald's" political writer. and curt anderson of the associated press. he's been tracking problems in polling places across the country. i know conditions varied from place to place, but what were the main drivers of the really long waits to cast a vote? >> well, in the case of florida as your piece mentio
now. >> election not on c-span. live coverage of president obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. and your reaction, by phone, e- mail, facebook and twitter. look for live coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. joining us is fred sainz, of the human rights campaign. why is the same sex ballot important? guest: marriage equality has never won at the ballot box. we have four races across the country. we stand a good chance for marriage equality to really be a firm -- affirmed by voters and our country for the first time in history. as a very important one for committed and loving gay and lesbian couples across the country that want nothing more than the freedom to marry. host: what states are involved? guest: the state of washington, maryland and maine. and in minnesota we are fighting a constitutional amendment that would prohibit marriage equality. legislature is in both of those states, they passed a law into effect, and catholic governors in both of those states signed those bills, both of those states have laws that allow citizens to go and re
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
in pennsylvania. and then another republican from texas also lost his seat. this is an ap story out of boston were the brahney/ryan campaign ended up last night. it says paul ryan will return to the house and resumed his role as budget committee chairman. we want to get your reaction to election 2012. our first call is from barbara in hudson, florida. you are calling on the independent line. for whom did you vote? caller: i voted for obama. at women's rights is a very big thing for me. also, medicare, been age 41 and disabled and also a rape victim -- a rape survivor, i should say. i believe obama has the best thing. i was going for mitt romney at first, but when he brought up the issue is about women's rights, and also with medicare and making a voucher program, and also social security, that is where i went toward obama this year. host: that was barbara in hudson, florida. next is mark from brownsville, texas on the republican line. you are on c-span. of what is your reaction to yesterday's election? disappointed in the way the election happen. i voted for mr. romney. i feel that because of the
on this gragraduate degree, he is workig at a domestic violence shelter in boston. harvard awarded him the thomas upton scholarship. pierre recently wrote an article about growing up as undocumented immigrant and here what is he said. "i am not a criminal, a monito , a predator, or swung had sits at someone doing nothing meaningful. i care for this country, as well as its sorrows and joys. i am not asking that our government maintain an open-door policy for immigrants. i am simply asking that it give an opportunity to those of us who have proven ourselves." well, pierre is right. america needs young people just like him who love their country and are dedicated to caring for our society's most vulnerable. so what do the american people think about the idea of the dream act? a bloomberg poll found that 64% of likely voters, almost two out of three, including 66% of independents support the policy compared to only 30% who oppose it. by a margin of 2-1 the american people know this is the right thing to do. now we need to pass a comprehensive immigration reform. on our side the negotiating effort wil
of college and got a job in my home town of boston at a telephone -- television station. they needed somebody to sweep the floors and i grabbed it right away. i was the lowest form of life and the television station. they were giving the last slice of cake to my cameraman's dog before me. i think that is important in a couple of ways. you get to do everything. when i was doing the low-level job, i was able to observe everything. i was able to watch everything. i think humility is a big part of the news business. we are just reporters. it is another thing that it's anotherin our world as the star system. anger people have become stars. that is and congress with just regular reporters. -- anchor people have become stars. you might be less than you think you are going to be at some point, that is actually a good thing. but the yourself in terms of being able to learn everything you can around the. i was watching because they had a radio station. i got to work for them and write to their copy for free in my spare time. my job was enough to pay the rent. my first editorial job, i did not get paid
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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